Recent Articles

    • 22/09/2022
    • 0
    2022 Feline Infectious peritonitis (FIP) Diagnosis Guidelines

    2022 Feline Infectious peritonitis (FIP) Diagnosis Guidelines

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) has gained a lot of attention recently. Research has demonstrated new antivirals effective for treatment of this once fatal disease. Unfortunately, these products are not legally available in many countries at this time, so we should keep attention to clinical trials and new drug approvals. Not only treatment but also diagnosis

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    • 30/08/2022
    • 6
    FECAVA Clinical Question of the Month: Urinary Incontinence in Female Dogs

    FECAVA Clinical Question of the Month: Urinary Incontinence in Female Dogs

    FECAVA is proud to initiate a virtual interactive topic to be discussed monthly amongst veterinarians who like a bit of a challenge. With the initiative ‘FECAVA Clinical Question of the Month’, we will post a companion animal-related question on our social media page, encouraging clinicians to attempt to answer the question as accurately as possible. The answer will

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    • 14/08/2022
    • 1
    KNMvD Protocol for Accidental Self-injection

    KNMvD Protocol for Accidental Self-injection

    KNMvD, Royal Dutch Veterinary Association, wrote a practical protocol for veterinary professionals in the case of accidental self-injection. In the event of an accidental self-injection, rapid and adequate action is required! Delaying or underestimating the risk too long can have serious consequences. In veterinary medicine, the most significant risk factors for accidental self-injection are reinserting

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    • 29/07/2022
    • 0
    FECAVA Infographics on heatstroke

    FECAVA Infographics on heatstroke

    As extreme summer temperatures hit across Europe, FECAVA produced an Infographic to inform pet owners to prevent and recognize signs of a life-threatening situation – heatstroke. HEATSTROKE IN DOGS Definition: Heatstroke occurs when normal body mechanisms can’t keep the body’s temperature in a safe range. Dogs don’t have efficient cooling systems like humans (who sweat) and

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